Moscow, Pullman Hospitals To Perform Gender Affirming Surgeries

Pullman Regional Hospital and Gritman Medical Center in nearby Moscow, Idaho, have announced they plan to offer gender confirmation surgeries. ANNA KING / NORTHWEST NEWS NETWORK

Listen

Two small-town hospitals in the Palouse have announced they plan to offer gender confirmation surgeries. The same surgeon would offer the procedure at Pullman Regional Hospital and Gritman Medical Center in nearby Moscow, Idaho.

Some in Moscow are excited that the hard-to-get gender confirmation surgeries will be offered in their rural towns—mostly known for growing wheat and the University of Idaho and the Washington State Cougars.

The pastor of a large conservative church there has asked his members who work at the hospital to opt out of helping with the surgeries.

The closest other popular places to get the procedure include Portland and San Francisco. Many people even travel abroad to avoid a years-long wait. And the prep, surgery and aftercare can be extensive. The patient often has to to live near the clinic or travel long distances.

Both hospitals said they aren’t sure yet when they will begin offering the surgeries.

The doctor still has to go through some last training and get certified by the medical staff of both hospitals. 


Some transgender Northwest residents say having the procedure closer to home, and more doctors in the region that can perform it, is a real service to the Inland Northwest transgender community. 


There are many types of surgeries performed for transgender people. The two Palouse hospitals are specifically pursuing offering vaginoplasty.

Copyright 2017 Northwest News Network. To see more, visit Northwest News Network.

 

Related Stories:

Rosalie Fish, running with a painted red handprint across her face and the letters "MMIW" along her leg to raise awareness of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women crisis. Photo courtesy of Fish.

In their own words: Rosalie Fish

For over 30 years, Native American Heritage Month has been federally recognized. Northwest Public Broadcasting reporters are interviewing Indigenous people throughout the region to learn what they think about the month and what they want people to understand about their culture and who they are. Reporter Lauren Gallup spoke with Rosalie Fish, a University of Washington student and athlete, who is using her platform to raise awareness of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women crisis. As the month ends, the recognition does not and we continue to publish these conversations and stories to inspire more engagement and understanding. Continue Reading In their own words: Rosalie Fish

Read More »