Episode 2: Paul Anders

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Jam Sets From This Episode

Meet Dan Maher

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Dan Maher originally fell in love with folk music as a teenager growing up in Spokane. A celebrated musician, he actually began his career in music during his college years at Washington State University, performing covers of the Eagles and Neil Young in venues around the area. His love for folk eventually led to his involvement with public radio as the host of what has come to be the weekly three-hour folk music radio show, Inland Folk, which is approaching its 31st year on the air. He is his own producer, editor and engineer for the show.

Having collected over three decades worth of folk music, Dan now eagerly makes the transition to the digital age. He likes the change to digital mainly because it makes it easier to share music, but has to admit that all those years of hauling music back and forth from home for the show has played its part in convincing him. As a student who recently helped him move about five thousand of his old vinyls said, “Nothing musical has a right to be this heavy anymore.”

Dan also works full-time for the office of Student Involvement and Leadership Development at WSU, coordinating student and organizational development programs, and is an advisor on multiple committees for ASWSU. In his free time he is an avid baseball fan, and loves listening to Vin Scully’s broadcasts of Dodgers games. Over the years Dan has generously volunteered his time during fund drives as well as offering free concerts in return for public support for both Spokane Public Radio and Northwest Public Radio.

Full Transcript

[Narrator] Support for Jam with Dan is provided by Alec McKay at Waterville and Tom Weber of Kennewick, and by viewers like you, thank you.

[Narrator] Here we go. ♪ Good road, good road ♪ ♪ I’m wishing you a good road ♪ ♪ May you find your comfort ♪ ♪ In friends along the way ♪

Here we are in the studios. Ladies and gentlemen, Mr. Paul Anders is here with all of his instruments because he’s sort of Mr. Music, and he does all kinds of music with all kinds of people. He works with jazz folks; he works with African musicians doing African music, but what else is it that you do, real quick, before we do a tune?

Oh, musically or non-musically?

No, no, no, no, no, non-musically, just so that we know that you’re–

Just an aquatic scientist.

Yeah?

Or a scientist who studies aquatic things.

That’s not just a just a.

Rather than being submerged.

Yeah, but that’s like saying you’re just a musician.

Yeah, yeah, well–

You know what I mean? No, no, no, no, because you’re really good.

Oh, thanks.

I’m so glad that you’re here because we’ve always been, we’ve known each other now for probably, oh, I don’t know–

Decades.

20 years, maybe?

[Paul] Yeah.

We show up at each other’s gigs, and sometimes I’m at your gigs, and you’re with all these people, and they’re all so good and everything, and I’m like, “Wow, I just gotta listen and learn.” You show up at my gigs, and you go, “I could teach him something.”

Here we are.

Yeah, so let’s–

You look great for all those years. Actually not sat down until the other night.

Yeah.

Just played duets.

Yeah, we played for, we were supposed to do for 40 minutes or something like that, and it was four hours or something. We left at a quarter to–

It was fun.

Yeah.

You know, he gets to talking, and time ticks on and on.

Yeah, so let’s play this tune now.

We already have.

Yeah I thought we–

Okay.

We’re gonna start out a little, maybe a little, instead of being upbeat, this is kind of a more of a downbeat thing, if you don’t mind. I liked what we did when we were practicing that one time. I may need another capo, actually.

You have to give me more of a hint.

Remember, we were talking about Mr. Bojangles? We’re doing.

Yeah.

You know what? They tried to sue Led Zeppelin for doing the Stairway to Heaven thing, some group did. This riff is probably more often done in music than just about any other riff, and nobody ever sued anybody for it. Remember this song? This is Michael Smith song. Michael Smith, out of Detroit, wrote this. This is for your instrument here.

♪ This here mandolin ♪ ♪ Is carved out of pine ♪ ♪ Was willed to me by an old hobo way down the line ♪ ♪ He donated this mandolin with these last words ♪ ♪ Before I pass over, boy, ♪ ♪ I’ll show you some chords ♪ ♪ Now, this here mandolin ♪ ♪ Is made out of earth and of stone ♪ ♪ The sound of that railroad ♪ ♪ Makes you feel all alone ♪ ♪ This here mandolin will take a hobo ♪ ♪ Back home ♪ ♪ This here mandolin ♪ ♪ Is so full of sand ♪ ♪ She’ll sing out a tune ♪ ♪ When there’s a cop on the train ♪ ♪ She’ll sing you the rhythm of the Super Chief ♪ ♪ Going out of St. Paul ♪ ♪ And that ain’t all ♪ ♪ Now this here mandolin ♪ ♪ Will make a young girl open up her window ♪ ♪ Like a warm breeze on a cold, rainy night ♪ ♪ Like a hex sign hanging out on a barn ♪ ♪ This old mandolin will keep a hobo ♪ ♪ From harm ♪ It’s all yours; play a little; play a little. ♪ This here mandolin ♪ ♪ Is carved out of pine ♪ ♪ And was willed to me by an old hobo way down the line ♪ ♪ And he donated this mandolin ♪ ♪ With these last words ♪ ♪ Before I pass over, boy ♪ ♪ I’ll show you some chords ♪ ♪ Now, this here mandolin ♪ ♪ Is made out of barns ♪ ♪ and old water tanks ♪ ♪ If the jukebox is busted ♪ ♪ And you need an old song ♪ ♪ This old mandolin will take a hobo ♪ ♪ Back home ♪ Nice. ♪ This here mandolin ♪ ♪ Is made out of barns and old water tanks ♪ ♪ If the jukebox is busted ♪ ♪ And you need an old song ♪ ♪ This here mandolin will take a hobo ♪ ♪ Back home ♪

[Paul] Only the second time I’ve heard that.

I thought this was only the second time you played it.

Yeah.

That’s how good you really are.

It’s kinda hard to play it if you can’t hear it.

Yeah.

I don’t know. You played me something, this is really neat of you to do this actually, and I, because you play so many different kinds and styles of music. This Jam with Dan thing, it’s interesting to me because it kind of makes me get out of my comfort zones, the old school folk stuff, and I have to do some things that I… We were messing around in my house, and I said, “Well, why don’t we try this?” We did this in the key of F. This is Sweet Georgia Brown. Nice.

♪ No gal made has got a shade ♪ ♪ Like the sweet Georgia Brown ♪ ♪ Two left feet, but oh so sweet ♪ ♪ Is sweet Georgia brown♪ ♪ They all sigh and wanna die ♪ ♪ For sweet Georgia Brown ♪ ♪ And I’ll tell ya just why ♪ ♪ You know that I do not lie, not much ♪ ♪ It’s been said that she’s knocks ’em dead ♪ ♪ When she lands in town ♪ ♪ Since she came, oh it’s a shame ♪ ♪ How she cools them down ♪ ♪ Fellas, she ain’t met ♪ ♪ Must be fellas that she can’t get ♪ ♪ Or some Georgia named her and Georgia claimed her ♪ ♪ Sweet Georgia Brown ♪ Aha! I gotta do this first, just make sure I get it right now. ♪ No gal made has got a shade ♪ ♪ Of sweet Georgia Brown ♪ ♪ Two left feet, but oh, so neat ♪ ♪ Is sweet Georgia Brown ♪ ♪ They all sigh and wanna die ♪ ♪ For sweet Ms. Georgia Brown ♪ ♪ And I’ll tell you just why ♪ ♪ You know that I do not lie ♪ ♪ Not much ♪ ♪ It’s been said she knocks ’em dead ♪ ♪ When she lands in town ♪ ♪ And since she came, why, it’s a shame ♪ ♪ How she cools ’em down ♪ ♪ Fellas ♪ ♪ She can’t get must be fellas ♪ ♪ That she ain’t met ♪ ♪ Georgia named her, Georgia claimed her ♪ ♪ Sweet Georgia Brown ♪ It’s working now. ♪ Georgia named her, Georgia claimed her ♪ ♪ Sweet Georgia Brown ♪ ♪ Well, Georgia named her, Georgia claimed her ♪ ♪ As sweet ♪ ♪ Georgia ♪ ♪ They call her Sweet Ms. Georgia Brown ♪ All right.

We even ended at the same time.

Yeah.

That sounds pretty nice.

We made it work.

You weren’t looking either, were ya? All right.

Yeah, that’s kinda fun. You play clawhammer banjo, more or less, right?

[Paul] Less, but I do it often.

Yeah

Yeah.

As opposed to three-finger bluegrass.

Correct. Yeah.

Yeah, that–

You describe the style with the–

Yeah.

The finger picks.

[Dan] How’d you get in playing all this music?

I grew up in a classical music family, and had violins all around us and played it a lot as a kid until I became sort of wise at the age of 10, when I realized everybody didn’t have to do that. I don’t know if I rebelled or not, or if that was just a preexisting condition, but–

[Dan] I think it was preexisting condition.

I had a bunch of music in the family around the house, both professionally classical, but also had a grandfather that played a lot of different kind of music. He kinda called it shmal-sing around, but it was, he had a Hawaiian band. He had some old time, he was from Poland and sang Polish folk songs and played stringed instruments from central Europe and just had a lot of music around, and he and I kinda hit it off and played a lot, and I must’ve had as much patience as anybody to play the same songs over and over for a while, but just had a blast. Then about high school, heard somebody playing fiddle in a barn, and it kinda sounded bad, and I thought, “Well, I could do that “just for fun,” and kinda got back into music. Got into the folk scene. got into clawhammer banjo and hammered dulcimers. He had got a mandolin for me when I graduated from high school and started playing that, and just played lots of different kinds of music, always interested in doing different music.

♪ When I was young and in my prime ♪ ♪ Well, I left my home in Caroline ♪ ♪ Now, all I do is sit and pine ♪ ♪ For that mountain home I left behind ♪ ♪ I got them Blue Ridge Mountain blues ♪ ♪ Gonna stand right here, and I’ll say ♪ ♪ My grip is packed for travel ♪ ♪ And I’ll soon be scratching gravel ♪ ♪ On the Blue Ridge far, far away ♪ Play her away, ♪ Well, I see a window with a light ♪ ♪ I see two heads of snowy white ♪ ♪ I can hear those old home folks recite ♪ ♪ Hey, where is my darling boy tonight? ♪ ♪ I got them Blue Ridge Mountain blues ♪ ♪ How I miss my own dog, Tray ♪ ♪ I’m gonna hunt that possum ♪ ♪ Where corn tops blossom ♪ ♪ On the Blue Ridge far, far away ♪ Do it, do it now. ♪ Well, I’m gonna do all right by my ma ♪ ♪ I’m gonna do all right by my pa ♪ ♪ I’m gonna lay around that cabin door ♪ ♪ Got no worries of work anymore ♪ ♪ I got them Blue Ridge Mountain blues ♪ ♪ Gonna stand right here, and I’ll say ♪ ♪ All my days I’m countin’ ♪ ♪ Till I reach that mountain ♪ ♪ On the Blue Ridge far, far away ♪ One more time through now. ♪ Well I’ve got them Blue Ridge Mountain blues ♪ ♪ Gonna stand right here, and I’ll say ♪ ♪ All my days I’m countin’ ♪ ♪ Till I reach that mountain ♪ ♪ On the Blue Ridge far, far away ♪ ♪ My grip is packed for travel ♪ ♪ And I’ll soon be scratching gravel ♪ ♪ On the Blue Ridge far, far away ♪

This song, and I know it’s kinda done at nauseam, but let’s see if we can get some good harmonica train-y stuff in here.

♪ Riding on ♪ ♪ The City of New Orleans ♪ ♪ The Illinois Central Monday morning rail ♪ ♪ There’s 15 cars, 15 restless riders ♪ ♪ There’s three conductors ♪ ♪ And 25 sacks of mail ♪ ♪ All along southbound odyssey ♪ ♪ The train pulls outta Kankakee ♪ ♪ Rolls along past houses, farms, and fields ♪ ♪ Yes, it’s passing towns that have no name ♪ ♪ Freight yards full of ol’ black men ♪ ♪ And the graveyards of rusted automobiles ♪ ♪ Just a-singin’ good morning America ♪ ♪ How are ya ♪ ♪ Singing, don’t you know me ♪ ♪ I’m your native son ♪ ♪ I am the train they call ♪ ♪ The City of New Orleans ♪ ♪ I’ll be gone 500 miles when the day is done ♪ ♪ Dealing card games ♪ ♪ For the old men in the club car ♪ ♪ There’s a penny a point ♪ ♪ There ain’t no one keeping score ♪ ♪ Hey, won’t you pass the paper bag ♪ ♪ That holds a bottle ♪ ♪ And feel the wheels a-rumblin’ ♪ ♪ ‘neath the floor ♪ ♪ And the son ♪ ♪ And the sons of Pullman porters ♪ ♪ And the sons of engineers ♪ ♪ Ride their fathers’ magic carpet made of steam ♪ ♪ And mothers with their babes asleep ♪ ♪ Are rocking to the gentle beat ♪ ♪ And the rhythm of the rails is all a dream ♪ ♪ Just singing ♪ ♪ Good morning, America, how are ya ♪ ♪ Singing, don’t you know me ♪ ♪ I am your native son ♪ ♪ I’m the train they call ♪ ♪ The City of New Orleans ♪ ♪ I’ll be gone 500 miles when the day is done ♪ Just give me a little bit of train ♪ Well, it’s nighttime on the City of New Orleans ♪ ♪ We’re changing cars down in Memphis, Tennessee ♪ ♪ Yeah, we’re halfway home ♪ ♪ And we’ll be there by morning ♪ ♪ Through the Mississippi darkness, rolling down to the sea ♪ ♪ But all the towns and people seem ♪ ♪ To fade into a bad dream ♪ ♪ Steel rails still ain’t heard the news ♪ ♪ The conductor sings his song again ♪ ♪ Passengers will please refrain ♪ ♪ This train’s got the disappearing railroad blues ♪ ♪ Just a-singin’, good morning, America ♪ ♪ How are ya ♪ ♪ Singing, don’t you know me ♪ ♪ I am your native son ♪ ♪ I am the train they call ♪ ♪ City of New Orleans ♪ ♪ I’ll be gone 500 miles when the day is done ♪ ♪ Just a-singin’ good morning, America ♪ ♪ How are ya ♪ ♪ Singing, don’t you know me ♪ ♪ I am your native son ♪ ♪ I am the train they call ♪ ♪ The City of New Orleans ♪ ♪ I’ll be gone 500 miles when the day is done ♪ ♪ I’ll be gone 500 miles ♪ ♪ I’ll be gone for a long, long while ♪ ♪ I’ll be gone 500 miles ♪ ♪ When the race is run ♪

that one.

What’s that?

Those minor keys are–

Those minor, yeah.

Or chords.

You gotta have some stories to tell about something musical that happened to you.

I probably do.

Just the biggest thrill of your lifetime besides jamming with me.

Yeah–

Which I know can’t be eclipsed.

I’m trying to think of something that compares.

I know him. I mean, just the magnitude–

Just lots of different things.

Just the magnitude of us in this room, that’s why there was never room for audience because of the magnitude.

Oh, is that it?

Yeah, magnitude is the word.

[Paul] As opposed to magnetism. What should–

What’s your biggest, what’s one of your biggest musical thrills? Performance or a jam or something like that. I have a lot in my group.

Yeah, I don’t know. We’ve had a lot of different groups and had a lot of different musical fun. There’s a lot of different kinds of that. We had a really lot of fun in the last few years with the big group, a guy probably some of you know around here, Simba Tirima, who’s from Kenya, and we had this big group around him that started kinda small and got really large. It was really fun because I really have taken a liking to a lot of this central African soukous music. It has just some real great, real basic rhythms, but really intricate and syncopated melodies, and it was sort of a humanitarian effort thinly veiled as a reggae dance party. It was a lot of fun to bring in people, young college students, music students, people, musicians who weren’t doing music school, and it was just a great sort of celebration of humanity through music, and that, besides watching kids that are 18-, 19-, 20-year-old students sort of realizing they can play music without formally looking at scores of sheet music or this is just, that’s a lot of fun. Everything from those big events to sitting around at the end of the day just relaxing, doing solo, doing little duets like this, to me, it’s as much the people as it is the music. Like we had the other night, sat around for hours and talked about a lot of things we had in common and past music, and past people, I think music is just a great way for humans to share different parts of their humanity.

[Dan] It just triggers so much, doesn’t it?

Yeah, yeah.

And you hope that people get it. Why don’t you get your harp out, and we’ll go out on Sitting on Top of the World?

Got it.

Yeah.

Key of A?

The key of A. The key of A; yeah, taking the train, aye? Thanks, again, man, and we’ll see you all around the bend, we’ll see you ’round the bend.

Yeah, yeah.

Yeah.

 ♪ ‘Twas in the spring ♪ Give me a riff. ♪ ‘Twas in the spring ♪ That wasn’t much of a riff. Give me a riff. Yeah ♪ ‘Twas in the spring ♪ ♪ One sunny day ♪ ♪ My baby left me ♪ ♪ She left and went away ♪ ♪ Now she’s gone ♪ ♪ But I don’t worry ♪ ♪ Well, I’m sittin’ on top of the world ♪ ♪ Oh, I went to Dallas ♪ ♪ And to El Paso ♪ ♪ I said, Oh baby ♪ ♪ Oh baby, don’t let me go ♪ ♪ But now she’s gone ♪ ♪ And I don’t worry ♪ ♪ ‘Cause I’m sitting on top of the world ♪ ♪ ‘Twas in the spring ♪ ♪ One sunny day ♪ ♪ My baby left me ♪ ♪ Left and went away ♪ ♪ And now she’s gone ♪ ♪ But I don’t worry ♪ ♪ ‘Cause I’m sittin’ on top of the world ♪ Play away, play hard now! ♪ Now in this room ♪ ♪ Had me a ball ♪ ♪ Got to play a lot of tunes ♪ ♪ With a good friend, Paul ♪ ♪ My baby’s gone ♪ ♪ That’s why I don’t worry ♪ ♪ ‘Cause I’m just sittin’ on top of the world ♪ ♪ ‘Twas in the spring ♪ ♪ One sunny day ♪ ♪ My baby left me ♪ ♪ She left and went away ♪ ♪ And now she’s gone ♪ ♪ And I don’t worry ♪ ♪ ‘Cause I’m sittin’ on top of the world ♪ and we’ll it together now. ♪ Was in the spring ♪ ♪ One sunny day ♪ ♪ You know my baby left me ♪ ♪ She left and went away ♪ ♪ And I’m just playing songs, and my baby’s gone ♪ ♪ And I don’t worry ♪ ♪ ‘Cause I’m sittin’ on top of the world ♪ ♪ We’re going out ♪ ♪ In a little bit of a hurry ♪ ♪ But we’re sittin’ on top of the world ♪

All right. Thanks a lot.

That was hot. ♪ Along the way ♪

[Narrator] Support for Jam with Dan is provided by Alec McKay of Waterville and Tom Weber of Kennewick, and by viewers like you, thank you.

 

 

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