Get Ready To Shake Out Thursday, October 17

On Thursday, October 17th at 10:17am you'll hear an earthquake drill on NWPB radio. Practice with us.

 

Most of the Northwest is prone to earthquakes. Are you prepared to survive and recover quickly?

You’ll hear a drill message on NWPB radio during the Great ShakeOut on October 17 at 10:17 AM. It’s a region-wide practice session on being safer during big earthquakes called Drop, Cover and Hold On.

The ShakeOut encourages everyone to review and update emergency preparedness plans and supplies and to secure your space in order to prevent damage and injuries. The more prepared you are now, the better off you’ll be during and after after the next big earthquake.

Most earthquake-related injuries and deaths are caused by collapsing walls and roofs, flying glass and falling objects. It is extremely important to move as little as possible during the shaking. Be sure to identify a few safe spots in your home, office or school that are easily accessible.

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