Northwest News

Northwest News

Wildfire evacuation notices that non-native English speakers did not comprehend prompted a new state law in Washington. CREDIT: THAN TUASON

How Do You Say ‘Evacuate’ In Tagalog? In A Disaster, English Isn’t Always Enough

Nearly 20 percent of people in Washington and 15 percent in Oregon speak a language other than English at home. Emergency managers from around the West are grappling with how to reach people in foreign languages in the midst of a disaster, at a time when a new Washington state law is seeking to raise the bar. Continue Reading How Do You Say ‘Evacuate’ In Tagalog? In A Disaster, English Isn’t Always Enough

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A pod of bottlenose dolphins and false killer whales was spotted off the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. CREDIT: LUKE HALPIN/HAPLIN WILDLIFE PRESERVE

Tropical Dolphins Are Appearing In Pacific Northwest Waters

While searching for seabirds in July of 2017, biologist Luke Halpin instead saw a sea bubbling with about 200 bottlenose dolphins and 70 false killer whales. It would be an unusual sight anywhere — bottlenose generally travel in much smaller groups — but Halpin’s sighting was made more remarkable by where it happened. These usually tropical animals were off the west coast of Canada. Continue Reading Tropical Dolphins Are Appearing In Pacific Northwest Waters

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The original location of Wilcox Family Farms, an egg farm, is in the shadow of Mount Rainier. CREDIT: EILIS O'NEILL

This Is What That ‘Salmon-Safe’ Label Says About Your Wine Or Eggs

One of the eco-labels Wilcox Farms acquired in recent years is “salmon-safe,” a label more often seen on craft beer and Northwest wine bottles than egg cartons. The salmon and steelhead in the Nisqually River have been declining for decades, and that’s a huge concern for the Nisqually Tribe. Continue Reading This Is What That ‘Salmon-Safe’ Label Says About Your Wine Or Eggs

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