Northwest News

Northwest News

Gonzaga guard Jalen Suggs (1) celebrates making the game winning basket against UCLA during overtime in a men's Final Four NCAA college basketball tournament semifinal game, April 3, 2021, at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis. Gonzaga won 93-90 in overtime. CREDIT: Michael Conroy/AP

To The Bank! Gonzaga Beats UCLA In Buzzer Beater, Advances To Men’s NCAA Final

Jalen Suggs took the inbounds pass and saw nothing but clear sailing. Three dribbles. Past the half-court line. A little stutter-step. And straight into history. The Gonzaga freshman banked in a shot at the buzzer from near the Final Four logo for a 93-90 overtime win over UCLA on Saturday night that vaulted the Bulldogs to within one win of an undefeated season and the national title. Continue Reading To The Bank! Gonzaga Beats UCLA In Buzzer Beater, Advances To Men’s NCAA Final

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Rattlesnake Mountain on the Hanford Reach National Monument has restricted and protected access. It's considered a sacred site by Northwest tribes, including the Yakama Nation and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla. CREDIT ANNA KING/NW NEWS NETWORK

‘It’s Irreversible’: Goldendale Green Energy Project Highlights A History Of Native Dispossession

The Goldendale Energy Storage Project would be a solution to generate energy when the sun isn’t shining or the wind isn’t blowing. But, to the Yakama Nation, the destruction of those sites would add another heartbreak to an ever-expanding list. Countless important cultural areas have faced destruction across the Northwest, largely because they’re not understood by non-tribal members. Continue Reading ‘It’s Irreversible’: Goldendale Green Energy Project Highlights A History Of Native Dispossession

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Seattle Daily Times front page saying Olmsted was Jailed.

Past As Prologue: A Seattle Police Bootlegging Racket Informs Lessons Of Modern Drug Cartels

Prohibition did not limit the demand of alcohol, and many people did not support it, including the police. On an early morning in March 1920, Seattle Police Lieutenant Roy Olmstead and Sergeant T.J. Clark met a crew of bootleggers loading a shipment of Canadian whiskey from Vancouver, B.C. for Seattle. Olmstead and Clark were not there to arrest the criminals, but to watch over the process, since they controlled the operation. Continue Reading Past As Prologue: A Seattle Police Bootlegging Racket Informs Lessons Of Modern Drug Cartels

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The Easterday family is known for growing potatoes, onions and beef cattle as one of the largest agribusinesses in the Columbia Basin of Washington and Oregon.

Cody Easterday, Washington Rancher At Heart Of Alleged Cattle Fraud, Pleads Guilty In Federal Court

Washington rancher Cody Easterday pleaded guilty Wednesday in federal district court to defrauding Tyson Foods Inc. and another unnamed company out of more than $244 million. Easterday admitted charging the companies for the costs of purchasing and feeding hundreds of thousands of fictitious cattle. Continue Reading Cody Easterday, Washington Rancher At Heart Of Alleged Cattle Fraud, Pleads Guilty In Federal Court

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Kristin May, an EMT with the Seattle Fire Dept., gives the first dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to a patient at a City of Seattle community COVID-19 testing and vaccination clinic in Seattle's Rainier Beach neighborhood in February 2021. CREDIT: Ted S. Warren/AP

Washington State Bumps Up Vaccine Eligibility To April 15 For All Residents Age 16 And Older

Washington state is opening up COVID-19 vaccine eligibility to all residents age 16 and older starting on April 15, Gov. Jay Inslee announced Wednesday. The federal government had directed states to make all adults eligible for COVID-19 vaccination by May 1, but most states had earlier plans, with more than a dozen opening eligibility to all adults this week. Continue Reading Washington State Bumps Up Vaccine Eligibility To April 15 For All Residents Age 16 And Older

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Nicole Grayson is a fourth-grade teacher at a private Christian school in Franklin, Tenn. She and her colleagues have noticed that students and teachers, who have been meeting mostly in person but wearing masks, haven't had the usual seasonal illnesses this year. Blake Farmer/WPLN News

Flu And Colds Are Down. Should We Continue Wearing Masks Beyond The Pandemic?

A study released this month in the Journal of Hospital Medicine, led by researchers from Vanderbilt University Medical Center, found that across 44 children’s hospitals, the number of pediatric patients hospitalized for respiratory illnesses is down 62%. Deaths have dropped dramatically too, compared with the last 10 years: The number of flu deaths among children is usually between 100 and 200 per year, but so far only one child has died from the disease in the U.S. during the 2020-2021 flu season. Continue Reading Flu And Colds Are Down. Should We Continue Wearing Masks Beyond The Pandemic?

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