Northwest News

Northwest News

Oregon State University researcher Chris Dunn next to a Douglas fir, which burned in Oregon’s September 2020 fires and was later cut down by fire crews who considered it a safety hazard. CREDIT: Jes Burns/OPB

Despite What The Logging Industry Says, Cutting Down Trees Isn’t Stopping Catastrophic Wildfires

In the decades since government restrictions reduced logging on federal lands, the timber industry has promoted the idea that private lands are less prone to wildfires, saying that forests thick with trees fuel bigger, more destructive blazes. But an analysis by OPB and ProPublica shows last month’s fires burned as intensely on private forests with large-scale logging operations as they did, on average, on federal lands that cut fewer trees. Continue Reading Despite What The Logging Industry Says, Cutting Down Trees Isn’t Stopping Catastrophic Wildfires

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A backpack and hiking poles in the snow by a hiking trail sign in Spokane County's Dishman Hills

The Importance Of Avoiding Cabin Fever During The Northwest’s Pandemic Winter

As we find ourselves in the coldest, darkest days of the year during the worst-case surge yet, it can feel like a herculean task just to take a daily walk around the block. Some studies found that even little five-minute outdoor excursions can benefit our health — but 20 to 60 minutes is even better. Continue Reading The Importance Of Avoiding Cabin Fever During The Northwest’s Pandemic Winter

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You Might Be Ready To Forget 2020. This Short Film with ‘Auld Lang Syne’ Reminds Why You Shouldn’t

Produced by a diverse group of filmmakers assembled by 1504, a studio based in Birmingham, Ala., For The Sake Of Old Times pairs the performance of “Auld Lang Syne” with archival footage from 2020, particularly of the summer’s racial justice protests. Continue Reading You Might Be Ready To Forget 2020. This Short Film with ‘Auld Lang Syne’ Reminds Why You Shouldn’t

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Yamauchi’s family settled in Pasco in 1907. His parents, Harry and Chieka Yamauchi, came to the Tri Cities with their oldest daughter, Lou and had a total of nine children.

Past As Prologue: ‘What Is An American?’ Asks A Soldier From Pasco Whose Family Was Interned

In this installment of the “Past as Prologue” series comes the story of a U.S. soldier, Sgt. George Yamauchi , from Pasco. He asked in 1943: ‘What is an American?’  Yamauchi penned the question in the local newspaper after his family was persecuted. The question defining who is an American is as relevant today as it was then.  Continue Reading Past As Prologue: ‘What Is An American?’ Asks A Soldier From Pasco Whose Family Was Interned

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Gary Carden, 63, has owned and managed Nespelem's only tavern for about 25 years. Earlier this year, he spent a month in the hospital with COVID-19. CREDITl Eilis O'Neill

‘Last Little Hurrah’ Thwarts Colville Tribes’ Effort To Keep COVID-19 Off Reservation

COVID-19 cases are hitting record highs throughout the state. And the reservation’s borders are fluid, so even the tribe’s extensive precautions haven’t been enough to fully protect Colville members. About 300 people on the Colville Reservation have tested positive for the coronavirus. Continue Reading ‘Last Little Hurrah’ Thwarts Colville Tribes’ Effort To Keep COVID-19 Off Reservation

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Farmer Ron Rosmann

Farmers Got Big Government Pandemic Relief In 2020, Even Those Who Didn’t Need It

The aid, delivered in two separate packages over the course of the year, went to a wide variety of people in agriculture, including corn and soybean farmers, cattle ranchers, and fruit and vegetable producers. The $46 billion in direct government payments to farmers in 2020 broke the previous annual record by about $10 billion, even after accounting for inflation. Continue Reading Farmers Got Big Government Pandemic Relief In 2020, Even Those Who Didn’t Need It

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Rachel Jameton, left, and Jane Finan, right

StoryCorps Northwest: Two Science Professors On The Importance Of Mentorship

Rachel Jameton struggled as a new teacher at Lewis Clark State College in Lewiston, Idaho. Her colleague, Jane Finan, co-taught biology with her. The two talk about mentorship and how disappointing a teacher can be transformative for a student, in this episode of  StoryCorps Northwest, recorded virtually. Continue Reading StoryCorps Northwest: Two Science Professors On The Importance Of Mentorship

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Anna King went to the KADLEC Emergency Room twice during her battle with COVID-19. Once she was having trouble breathing, another time the virus attacked her inner ear, giving her vertigo. CREDIT: Anna King/N3

Correspondent And COVID ‘Long Hauler’ Anna King: As 2021 Rings In, Consider Staying Home

The first time it happened, it was a squeezing feeling. I felt like I couldn’t breathe. My heart raced. At the hospital, I got an EKG and took a blood test. It wasn’t a heart attack. Just felt like one. Doctors are learning COVID-19 isn’t just a respiratory illness. Some of those who’ve had it, like me, end up with heart inflammation, heart rhythm problems or worse. Continue Reading Correspondent And COVID ‘Long Hauler’ Anna King: As 2021 Rings In, Consider Staying Home

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An open door into a school classroom with a Zoom meeting in progress sign

Schools Face A Massive Challenge To Make Up For Learning Lost During The Pandemic

Some school districts are reporting a higher level of failing grades this fall. A report from the consultant McKinsey & Company estimated that students were three months behind in math when they started the school year. And another study said learning losses were minimal, but left out many students from the analysis. Continue Reading Schools Face A Massive Challenge To Make Up For Learning Lost During The Pandemic

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The Plutonium Finishing Plant at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. The site includes 56 million gallons of radioactive waster across 580 square miles.

Aging Tanks, Aging Watchdogs: Lots To Work On For Washington’s New Waste Program Manager

David Bowen has owned his own bar in Cle Elum, been a Kittitas County commissioner and managed groundwater nitrate cleanup in the Yakima Valley. Now, he’ll hold the U.S. Department of Energy accountable for its cleanup at the site using the Tri-Party Agreement. That’s a 1989 document struck between Ecology, the federal Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Continue Reading Aging Tanks, Aging Watchdogs: Lots To Work On For Washington’s New Waste Program Manager

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Black man in the middle of whites in line at grocery store.

Past As Prologue: Remembering A Pasco Civil Rights Protest And Discrimination That Built Tri-Cities

By 1950, 20% of Pasco’s approximately 10,000 residents were Black, almost all living in slum conditions. Few lived in the new atomic community of Richland and none in “lily-white” Kennewick — a fact of which Kennewick city leaders and police at the time were proud. Not only was housing segregated, but Black residents were forced to endure broad discrimination in employment and education. Continue Reading Past As Prologue: Remembering A Pasco Civil Rights Protest And Discrimination That Built Tri-Cities

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