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Tiffany Krueger, owner of Athena Fitness and Wellness in Olympia, says the governor's new 17-foot distancing rule for fitness clubs is unfair and could put her out of business. Courtesy of Tiffany Krueger

She Followed Rules And Took COVID Seriously. But Now An Olympia Gym Owner Is ‘Freaking Pissed’

On Aug. 3, Gov. Inslee announced new rules for indoor fitness studios and gyms that nearly tripled the required spacing between class participants from six feet to 17 feet. Krueger expressed her frustration in a 4-minute video she posted to Instagram. “I have to say that I am freaking pissed,” she said in the video. “We’re unable to pay our bills with these mandates; that is the reality.” Continue Reading She Followed Rules And Took COVID Seriously. But Now An Olympia Gym Owner Is ‘Freaking Pissed’

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The Idaho House of Representatives chamber in February 2020 before voting to pass a bill banning transgender women and girls from competing in women’s sports in school settings. The Trump administration is supporting Idaho's new law banning transgender women from competing in women's sports. It's the first law of its kind in the nation and the U.S. Department of Justice backed it in a court filing on June 19, 2020. CREDIT: Keith Ridler/AP

Worried About ‘Totalitarianism,’ Some Idaho Lawmakers Want To Change School Closure Authority

The Education Working Group requested the Legislature take up the issue of school closure authority when Gov. Brad Little convenes an extraordinary session of the Legislature the week of Aug. 24. Currently, health districts do have the authority to issue quarantine orders or close schools. Continue Reading Worried About ‘Totalitarianism,’ Some Idaho Lawmakers Want To Change School Closure Authority

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Beyond the borders of the Kalmiopsis Wilderness are as much as 200,000 acres of undeveloped forest.

Rule Protecting The Northwest’s Old-Growth Trees Is Under The Federal Government’s Ax

This latest rollback proposal, issued Tuesday, comes from the Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region. It would end a 25-year-old provision that prevents logging of trees that exceed 21 inches in diameter in six national forests across Eastern Oregon and Washington. Continue Reading Rule Protecting The Northwest’s Old-Growth Trees Is Under The Federal Government’s Ax

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Most of the wolves in Washington are in the northeastern part of the state. A bill by Republican state Rep. Joel Kretz proposes a wolf sanctuary on Bainbridge Island. CREDIT: WASHINGTON DEPT. OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Wildlife Managers Will Kill More Wolves In Northeastern Washington After Livestock Killings

The state of Washington on Tuesday ordered that more endangered wolves be killed in a pack that continued to prey on cattle in Stevens County even after one member was eliminated. The decision was criticized by conservation groups who want the state to stop killing wolves. The state has killed more than 30 wolves since 2012. Continue Reading Wildlife Managers Will Kill More Wolves In Northeastern Washington After Livestock Killings

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Seattle Police Chief Carmen Best said in a letter to the department: "This was a difficult decision for me, but when it's time, it's time." CREDIT: Elaine Thompson/AP

Seattle Police Chief Carmen Best Stepping Down Following Department Cuts, Months Of Protest

Seattle’s police chief says she is stepping down, a move made public the same day the City Council approved reducing the department by as many as 100 officers through layoffs and attrition. Carmen Best, the city’s first Black police chief, said in a letter to the department that her retirement will be effective Sept. 2 and the mayor has appointed Deputy Chief Adrian Diaz as the interim chief. Continue Reading Seattle Police Chief Carmen Best Stepping Down Following Department Cuts, Months Of Protest

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Thinning, mowing and prescribed fire are used in Ponderosa pine forests to maintain an open forest floor. CREDIT: Jes Burns/OPB/EarthFix

Washington Firefighter Quarantining With COVID; It’s A Test Of Safety Plan Ahead Of Wildfire Weather

The firefighter contracted COVID-19 outside of the fire camp. He tested positive after he left the fire. The firefighter came into contact with 14 others, who have now been quarantined and aren’t showing symptoms right now, according to the DNR. This year, fire camps have been kept smaller and more spaced out – to help prevent widespread outbreaks. Continue Reading Washington Firefighter Quarantining With COVID; It’s A Test Of Safety Plan Ahead Of Wildfire Weather

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Golden wheat got a recent crew cut outside of Walla Walla, Washington. Experts say the 2020 Washington and Oregon crops look about average, saved by late-spring rains.

Late Spring Rains Save Northwest Wheat Crop Yields, But Price Still Down

The latest harvest estimates say Washington ranchers will harvest nearly 153 million bushels of wheat and Oregon 44 million bushels. That’s around average for both states. A typical barge holds around 122,500 bushels of wheat — meaning 44 million bushels would be about 360 barges full of grain on the Snake and Columbia Rivers heading toward export terminals. Continue Reading Late Spring Rains Save Northwest Wheat Crop Yields, But Price Still Down

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