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People wait in line for the COVID-19 vaccine in Paterson, N.J., Thursday, Jan. 21, 2021. Some hospitals around the U.S. are facing complaints about favoritism and line-jumping after their board members and donors received COVID-19 vaccinations or offers for inoculations. CREDIT: Seth Wenig/AP

Playing Favorites? Hospital Boards And Donors, Some In Washington, Get Vaccine Priority Offer

While millions of Americans wait for the COVID-19 vaccine, hospital board members, their trustees and donors around the country have gotten early access to the scarce drug or offers for vaccinations, raising complaints about favoritism tainting decisions about who gets inoculated and when. Continue Reading Playing Favorites? Hospital Boards And Donors, Some In Washington, Get Vaccine Priority Offer

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Protesters gesture to U.S. Capitol Police in the hallway outside of the Senate chamber inside the Capitol on Wednesday. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

‘This Is War’: Inside The Secret Chat Where Extremists Devised Their Plans After U.S. Capitol Attack

When the FBI arrested Edward “Jake” Lang on Jan. 16 for his alleged role in the U.S. Capitol attack, court documents show agents had followed a seemingly straightforward trail from his public social media to collect evidence. “THIS IS ME,” Lang wrote over one video. The chats also make clear that at least some of those involved in the Capitol insurrection, despite a sweeping crackdown by U.S. law enforcement that has resulted in more than 160 cases, appear dedicated to planning and participating in further violence. Continue Reading ‘This Is War’: Inside The Secret Chat Where Extremists Devised Their Plans After U.S. Capitol Attack

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In this March 28, 2019 photo pot products line a display case at a marijuana shop in Seattle. A proposed constitutional amendment that would prevent the legalization of marijuana in Idaho has moved forward as lawmakers in the state try to halt the increasing acceptance of the drug nationwide. CREDIT: Elaine Thompson/AP

As More States Legalize Pot, Idaho Lawmakers Move To Cement A Permanent Constitutional Ban

As legal weed becomes a reality in every corner of the U.S., Idaho is putting up a fight. State lawmakers on Friday moved forward with a proposed constitutional amendment that would bar the legalization of marijuana in Idaho in an attempt to keep the growing nationwide acceptance of the drug from seeping across its borders. Continue Reading As More States Legalize Pot, Idaho Lawmakers Move To Cement A Permanent Constitutional Ban

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Advocates for police accountability and racial justice rallied on the steps of the Washington Capitol in June 2020. Now the Washington Legislature is taking up those issues as it welcomes a record number of lawmakers of color. CREDIT: Austin Jenkins/N3

Washington Legislature Sees Record Diversity As Majority Democrats Pledge Focus On Equity

This year, the Washington State Legislature has welcomed a record number of lawmakers of color, including a record number of Black lawmakers who are all Democrats. The increasing diversity comes in the wake of last year’s civil rights protests and amid ongoing demands for police accountability and racial justice. Continue Reading Washington Legislature Sees Record Diversity As Majority Democrats Pledge Focus On Equity

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All new cars sold in Washington state would need to be electric by 2030 if the legislature approves a pending bill. CREDIT: Tom Banse/N3

Washington Lawmakers Consider Shifting All New Car Sales To Electric Only By 2030

You may be used to hearing a pushy car salesperson ask the timeless question, “What can I do to get you in this car?” But one big thing could be different in Washington state a decade from now. Proposals introduced this winter in the Washington Legislature would end sales of new gasoline-powered cars in the state by 2030. Continue Reading Washington Lawmakers Consider Shifting All New Car Sales To Electric Only By 2030

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The Tyson Fresh Meats plant in Wallula, Washington, near Pasco. CREDIT: Anna King/N3

Cattle Wars: Amid Lawsuit, Washington’s Easterday Ranches Sells Feed Property To Tyson Competitor

As the public media Northwest News Network reported Wednesday, Tyson recently filed a suit against Washington-based Easterday Ranches seeking to get a neutral third party to take over the business until accounts could be settled. It came after Easterday allegedly made up hundreds of thousands of cattle on paper and fictitiously fed them, costing Tyson more than $225 million. But now, in a twist, Easterday Ranches has sold its major feedlot property in Franklin County known as the “North Lot” to a competitor: AB Livestock of Boise, Idaho. Continue Reading Cattle Wars: Amid Lawsuit, Washington’s Easterday Ranches Sells Feed Property To Tyson Competitor

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Deception Pass State Park, on the north end of Whidbey Island. CREDIT: Washington State Parks

Washington Approves More SEAL Training In State Parks, But Not As Much As Navy Requested

The permits would expand the five parks previously used for Navy SEAL training to 16 or 17. The Navy had requested access to 28 state parks as a way to diversify its training sites. Officials had said a small number of sites can become too familiar to trainees overtime. Continue Reading Washington Approves More SEAL Training In State Parks, But Not As Much As Navy Requested

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Photo of George Pullman

Past As Prologue: How The Namesake Of Pullman Tried To Improve Worker’s Lives, But Failed

The strike—and the violence that occurred—became George Pullman’s legacy, rather than his attempt to create the utopian worker’s town. When he died, his family buried him in a lead-lined coffin because they were concerned workers would try to desecrate it.  Continue Reading Past As Prologue: How The Namesake Of Pullman Tried To Improve Worker’s Lives, But Failed

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Ramón Núñez is currently driving for food delivery services to make money after switching from driving for Uber in order to lessen his exposure to COVID-19. He is photographed in Issaquah on Jan. 27, 2021. He is one of about 60,000 undocumented immigrants to get funds from the state during the pandemic. CREDIT: Dorothy Edwards/Crosscut

Undocumented Workers, Disproportionately Hit By Pandemic, May Get More Help In Washington

If approved next month, the additional $70 million would make Washington state a nationwide leader in help offered to the undocumented community, which has been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic, Latino and Black people in particular. Last year, California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced an unprecedented $125 million in aid for undocumented workers. Washington state is poised to match or exceed that amount. Continue Reading Undocumented Workers, Disproportionately Hit By Pandemic, May Get More Help In Washington

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