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Northwest News

Senators watch Gov. Brad Little’s 2021 State of the State address from the floor of the Senate chambers. Because of COVID-19 precautions, Little delivered the address remotely instead of in the traditional joint gathering of the House and Senate chambers. CREDIT: Nik Streng/ Idaho EdNews

Analysis: The Showdown Between Idaho Lawmakers And Governor That Could Define 2021 Session

With at least 11 pieces of legislation already in the pipeline — all addressing some aspect of Little’s coronavirus response, and the Legislature’s role during an emergency — this issue is a long way from settled. And it could be a fascinating, defining debate of the 2021 session. Separation of powers, once the stuff of a “Schoolhouse Rock” segment, is all a bit more real to many Idahoans. Continue Reading Analysis: The Showdown Between Idaho Lawmakers And Governor That Could Define 2021 Session

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Alexandra Sasha Grieb and Kyleigh Dabler, both 19, from Kennewick, waved at passing cars driving by Richland’s John Dam Plaza. Grieb said it will be up to younger generations to fight climate change now with their votes. “The earth will survive climate change. Humans won’t,” she said. CREDIT: Courtney Flatt/NWPB

In One Of His First Acts, President Biden Moves To Have U.S. Join Paris Climate Agreement

The U.S. officially withdrew from the accord to limit climate-warming greenhouse gas emissions late last year, after President Donald Trump began the process in 2017. It is the only country of the nearly 200 signatories that has withdrawn. Biden vowed to sign on Inauguration Day the documents needed to rejoin the agreement. Continue Reading In One Of His First Acts, President Biden Moves To Have U.S. Join Paris Climate Agreement

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John Hess holding a sign describing President Joe Biden as a “traitor” and a “thief," as he stands outside a barricade set up by state troopers at the Washington state Capitol building, Jan. 20, 2021. CREDIT: Melissa Santos/Crosscut

With Worries Of Armed Protests, Inauguration Day At Washington State Capitol Was Quiet

Washington National Guard troops were on site to guard against any repeat of the violence and disruption seen Jan. 6. While security forces were less visible than they have been in recent days, a spokesperson for the Washington State Patrol said they were still there protecting the seat of the Washington state government. He declined to share more information, but said the force was not small. Continue Reading With Worries Of Armed Protests, Inauguration Day At Washington State Capitol Was Quiet

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Mary Estime-Irvin, a councilwoman in North Miami, Fla., writes the name of a friend lost to COVID-19 on a symbolic tombstone that is part of a pandemic memorial at Griffing Park in North Miami in October. CREDIT: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

U.S. Records 400,000 Lives Lost To COVID At 1-Year Mark Of 1st Confirmed Case In Washington

While millions wait for a lifesaving shot, the U.S. death toll from the coronavirus continues to soar upward with horrifying speed. On Tuesday, the last full day of Donald Trump’s presidency, the official death count reached 400,000 — a once-unthinkable number. More than 100,000 Americans have perished in the pandemic in just the past five weeks. Continue Reading U.S. Records 400,000 Lives Lost To COVID At 1-Year Mark Of 1st Confirmed Case In Washington

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