Northwest News

Northwest News

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee sets out on a test drive Wednesday, April 17, 2019 in a Toyota Mirai hydrogen fuel cell car. CREDIT: TOM BANSE/N3

Is There Room For Hydrogen-Powered Cars In A Future That Looks Electric?

Today, automakers Toyota, Honda, Hyundai and Mercedes make hydrogen fuel cell electric cars in very limited numbers. None of their Pacific Northwest dealers currently stock or sell those models to local drivers. Nevertheless, Toyota is laying the groundwork to bring its hydrogen-powered vehicles to the Northwest. Continue Reading Is There Room For Hydrogen-Powered Cars In A Future That Looks Electric?

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Melissa Block during live election night coverage. CREDIT: Stephen Voss/WBAA, courtesy of NPR.

NPR’s Melissa Block Visits Pullman, Reflects On Murrow’s Legacy: ‘Without Facts, What Do We Have?’

NPR’s Melissa Block sat down with NWPB’s Thom Kokenge during ‘All Things Considered’ to discuss her experiences as a journalist, NPR’s legacy and the state of journalism today. She was in Pullman to receive The Edward R. Murrow Lifetime Achievement Award at Washington State University. Continue Reading NPR’s Melissa Block Visits Pullman, Reflects On Murrow’s Legacy: ‘Without Facts, What Do We Have?’

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Fred Farris, the father of Keaton Farris, and Island County Jail Chief Jose Briones pose together on the Coupeville Wharf. CREDIT: AUSTIN JENKINS/N3

Booked And Buried: After Dehydration Death, Grieving Father And Jail Chief Form Surprising Bond

Four years ago this month, Keaton Farris died naked, dehydrated and malnourished on the floor of an isolation cell in the Island County Jail on Whidbey Island. Farris, who was bipolar and in the throes of a mental health crisis, had been arrested 18 days earlier for failing to appear in court for allegedly stealing and cashing a $355 check. An investigation later found Farris’ death was the result of a series of individual and system failures. Continue Reading Booked And Buried: After Dehydration Death, Grieving Father And Jail Chief Form Surprising Bond

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Changing the clock for the first Daylight Saving Time in 1918. CREDIT: U.S. SENATE HISTORICAL OFFICE

Washington Legislature Votes To End Twice-Yearly Time Changes (Your Move, Oregon)

A measure to adopt daylight saving time all year-round is now one small step away from the desk of Washington Gov. Jay Inslee. The same issue is still chugging along in the Oregon and California legislatures as part of a loosely coordinated movement to dispense with the unpopular ritual of springing forward and falling back. Continue Reading Washington Legislature Votes To End Twice-Yearly Time Changes (Your Move, Oregon)

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Deputy Justin DeRosier

UPDATE: Suspect Identified In Fatal Shooting Of Cowlitz County Sheriff’s Deputy Justin DeRosier

Authorities identified the Cowlitz County Sheriff’s deputy who was fatally shot while responding to a parking incident on a rural roadway Saturday night as 29-year-old Justin DeRosier. Late Sunday night, the sheriff’s department reported that officers had engaged near Spencer Creek Road in Kalama, Washington, with a person referred to as a suspect in the DeRosier shooting. Continue Reading UPDATE: Suspect Identified In Fatal Shooting Of Cowlitz County Sheriff’s Deputy Justin DeRosier

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A member of the Wolf Creek Hotshots uses a drip torch to ignite the forest floor during a prescribed burn near Sisters, Oregon. CREDIT: JES BURNS

‘Good Fire’ Season: How Land Managers Select Areas For Prescribed Burns

Land managers are using prescribed burns — also called “good fire” — and thinning to restore forests and reduce the extra wood, sticks and needles that fuel megafires. Different land managers look for certain things when they’re selecting where prescribed fires will work best. Continue Reading ‘Good Fire’ Season: How Land Managers Select Areas For Prescribed Burns

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