Northwest News

Northwest News

Tammie Corter with her son Tyler Groseclose who is severely autistic and non-verbal and a current client of Aacres Washington in Spokane. COURTESY TAMMIE CORTER

Troubles Resurface For Washington In-Home Care Provider After ‘Unusual And Troubling’ Death

It’s been more than a year since the state Department of Social and Health Services took the unprecedented step of shutting down a major in-home care provider for developmentally disabled adults. Now, 16 months after the provider’s sister company, Aacres Washington, took over care of many of those vulnerable adults, the cycle is repeating itself. Continue Reading Troubles Resurface For Washington In-Home Care Provider After ‘Unusual And Troubling’ Death

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Washington's Department of Children Youth and Families removed youth from Clarinda Academy in Iowa following an investigation by Disability Rights Washington. CREDIT: DISABILITY RIGHTS WASHINGTON

Washington Reduces Number Of Foster Youth Out Of State, But In-State Beds Still Lacking

A year ago, Washington state had 82 hard-to-place foster youths, mostly teenagers, living in facilities in states as far away as South Carolina, prompting calls to bring them home. As of Aug. 1, that number had been reduced by more than half to 38, according to the Department of Children Youth and Families. Continue Reading Washington Reduces Number Of Foster Youth Out Of State, But In-State Beds Still Lacking

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a sign for a prescribed burn in the Giant Sequoia National Monument, Calif., remains posted two years after the fire. The prescribed burn, a low-intensity, closely managed fire, was intended to clear out undergrowth and protect the heart of Kings Canyon National Park from a future threatening wildfire. The tactic is considered one of the best ways to prevent the kind of catastrophic destruction that has become common, but its use falls woefully short of goals in the West. CREDIT: BRIAN MELLEY/AP

Across The West, Land Managers Face Hurdles In Fighting Fire With Fire

Prescribed fires are credited with making forests healthier and stopping or slowing the advance of some blazes. Despite those successes, there are plenty of reasons they are not set as often as officials would like, ranging from poor conditions to safely burn to bureaucratic snags and public opposition. Continue Reading Across The West, Land Managers Face Hurdles In Fighting Fire With Fire

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Colville Tribal member Crystal Conant releases the final salmon into the upper Columbia River on Friday, Aug. 9, 2019. Conant said salmon’s reintroduction to the upper Columbia will help heal the tribe and the ecosystem. CREDIT: COURTNEY FLATT/NWPB

Tribes Release 1st Salmon Into Upper Columbia Since Dam Construction

Salmon are now swimming in the upper Columbia River for the first time in decades. For regional Native tribes, Friday’s ceremonial fish release is a big step toward catching fish in traditional waters. Cheers erupted from the crowd as the first salmon was released since 1955 into the Columbia River above Chief Joseph Dam. Continue Reading Tribes Release 1st Salmon Into Upper Columbia Since Dam Construction

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