Northwest News

Northwest News

Pre-K students at Boise’s Garfield Elementary School work on writing their names. CREDIT: Sami Edge/Idaho Education News

Once Most Impacted Washington Counties, Yakima And Tri-Cities Look Toward Schools Reopening

Some Washington counties hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic are now looking toward the possibility of reopening schools for in-person classes. It’s thanks to metrics like hospital bed capacity and the virus incidence rate that continue to improve in Benton, Franklin and Yakima counties. Continue Reading Once Most Impacted Washington Counties, Yakima And Tri-Cities Look Toward Schools Reopening

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The Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. CREDIT: BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION

Federal Decision To Keep Snake River Dams In Place Is Now Official. Controversy Far From Over

After four years of study, the Record of Decision makes the federal agencies’ preferred option official. Managers and dam supporters say it will benefit salmon, reliable hydropower and the economy. Wild salmon advocates, tribal representatives and renewable energy advocates say this decision will hurt salmon and the orcas that depend on them for food. Continue Reading Federal Decision To Keep Snake River Dams In Place Is Now Official. Controversy Far From Over

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The Talking Cedar brewpub and distillery opened to the public this summer in Grand Mound. CREDIT: Tom Banse/N3

Chehalis Tribe Opens Distillery, After Centuries-Old Nationwide Prohibition Overturned

A new distillery will soon begin making whiskey, vodka and gin on Chehalis tribal land in southwest Washington state. It’s the first legal, Native-owned distillery to open on tribal land in the nation. The Chehalis Tribe’s effort to diversify its economy by joining the craft spirits boom had to first overcome a nearly two century old prohibition on liquor production in Indian Country. Continue Reading Chehalis Tribe Opens Distillery, After Centuries-Old Nationwide Prohibition Overturned

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Warm Springs first tribal council in 1928. From left to right: George Meachum, Isaac McKinley, Charley McKinley, Nathan Heath and Jackson Culps. Courtesy of The Museum at Warm Springs

Congress Formally Acknowledges 155-Year-Old Betrayal Of Warm Springs And Wasco Tribes

Faced with the threat of forced removal or worse, in 1855 leaders of the Warm Springs and Wasco Tribes forfeited their claim to roughly ten million acres, and moved to a reservation. In exchange for land to offer white settlers, brokers for the United States government made promises. Among those: Tribal members would not be stopped from traveling off the reservation to hunt, fish and forage, as they had done for millennia. Continue Reading Congress Formally Acknowledges 155-Year-Old Betrayal Of Warm Springs And Wasco Tribes

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