Northwest News

Northwest News

President Trump pardoned Dwight and Steven Hammond Tuesday, June 10 2018 CREDIT: OPB

Ranchers Whose Federal Arson Case Sparked Malheur Refuge Takeover May Get Grazing Rights

The federal government has proposed awarding grazing allotments to an Oregon ranching family whose members were convicted of arson in a court battle that triggered the takeover of a federal wildlife refuge by right-wing extremists. The Dec. 31 action by the Bureau of Land Management in favor of Hammond Ranches angered environmental groups. Continue Reading Ranchers Whose Federal Arson Case Sparked Malheur Refuge Takeover May Get Grazing Rights

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An aerial view of clear-cuts near the south fork of Gordon Creek, one of two water sources for Corbett, Oregon. CREDIT: Google Earth

Timber Tax Cuts Cost Rural Northwest Towns Billions. Polluted Water Drove Up The Price

In rainy Oregon, communities tap a network of streams and creeks to supply millions of residents with cold, clean water. The problem is that the land surrounding drinking water streams is, in many cases, owned not by the towns or the residents who drink the water, but by private timber companies that are now logging more intensively than ever, cutting trees on a more rapid cycle and spraying herbicides to kill other plants that compete with replanted seedlings for sunlight. Continue Reading Timber Tax Cuts Cost Rural Northwest Towns Billions. Polluted Water Drove Up The Price

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With the help of a contractor, Chris Wilkerson makes monthly visits to RVs and motor homes around the city that don't have access to dumping stations.

In Seattle, People Living In Their RVs Get Help From City Waste Pumper

Starting around 2010, there has been a significant increase in spills coming from RVs and other vehicles in Seattle. It was happening as the number of people living out of their vehicles was on the rise. By one count, 891 people lived out of their vehicles in Seattle and the surrounding area in 2010. Now that number is close to 3,000. Continue Reading In Seattle, People Living In Their RVs Get Help From City Waste Pumper

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"It sounds like a friend now instead of an enemy," John Prine says of his singing voice.

101 Songs You Turned To In 2020 To Help Navigate A Tumultuous Year

As 2020 came to a close, we asked artists and authors about the songs that helped them survive a strange and devastating year. We also posed that question to you, and compiled a playlist of 101 songs that you played over and over again this year. Some songs offered an escape. Some infused joy and despair. Continue Reading 101 Songs You Turned To In 2020 To Help Navigate A Tumultuous Year

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Oregon State University researcher Chris Dunn next to a Douglas fir, which burned in Oregon’s September 2020 fires and was later cut down by fire crews who considered it a safety hazard. CREDIT: Jes Burns/OPB

Despite What The Logging Industry Says, Cutting Down Trees Isn’t Stopping Catastrophic Wildfires

In the decades since government restrictions reduced logging on federal lands, the timber industry has promoted the idea that private lands are less prone to wildfires, saying that forests thick with trees fuel bigger, more destructive blazes. But an analysis by OPB and ProPublica shows last month’s fires burned as intensely on private forests with large-scale logging operations as they did, on average, on federal lands that cut fewer trees. Continue Reading Despite What The Logging Industry Says, Cutting Down Trees Isn’t Stopping Catastrophic Wildfires

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A backpack and hiking poles in the snow by a hiking trail sign in Spokane County's Dishman Hills

The Importance Of Avoiding Cabin Fever During The Northwest’s Pandemic Winter

As we find ourselves in the coldest, darkest days of the year during the worst-case surge yet, it can feel like a herculean task just to take a daily walk around the block. Some studies found that even little five-minute outdoor excursions can benefit our health — but 20 to 60 minutes is even better. Continue Reading The Importance Of Avoiding Cabin Fever During The Northwest’s Pandemic Winter

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You Might Be Ready To Forget 2020. This Short Film with ‘Auld Lang Syne’ Reminds Why You Shouldn’t

Produced by a diverse group of filmmakers assembled by 1504, a studio based in Birmingham, Ala., For The Sake Of Old Times pairs the performance of “Auld Lang Syne” with archival footage from 2020, particularly of the summer’s racial justice protests. Continue Reading You Might Be Ready To Forget 2020. This Short Film with ‘Auld Lang Syne’ Reminds Why You Shouldn’t

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Yamauchi’s family settled in Pasco in 1907. His parents, Harry and Chieka Yamauchi, came to the Tri Cities with their oldest daughter, Lou and had a total of nine children.

Past As Prologue: ‘What Is An American?’ Asks A Soldier From Pasco Whose Family Was Interned

In this installment of the “Past as Prologue” series comes the story of a U.S. soldier, Sgt. George Yamauchi , from Pasco. He asked in 1943: ‘What is an American?’  Yamauchi penned the question in the local newspaper after his family was persecuted. The question defining who is an American is as relevant today as it was then.  Continue Reading Past As Prologue: ‘What Is An American?’ Asks A Soldier From Pasco Whose Family Was Interned

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Gary Carden, 63, has owned and managed Nespelem's only tavern for about 25 years. Earlier this year, he spent a month in the hospital with COVID-19. CREDITl Eilis O'Neill

‘Last Little Hurrah’ Thwarts Colville Tribes’ Effort To Keep COVID-19 Off Reservation

COVID-19 cases are hitting record highs throughout the state. And the reservation’s borders are fluid, so even the tribe’s extensive precautions haven’t been enough to fully protect Colville members. About 300 people on the Colville Reservation have tested positive for the coronavirus. Continue Reading ‘Last Little Hurrah’ Thwarts Colville Tribes’ Effort To Keep COVID-19 Off Reservation

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Farmer Ron Rosmann

Farmers Got Big Government Pandemic Relief In 2020, Even Those Who Didn’t Need It

The aid, delivered in two separate packages over the course of the year, went to a wide variety of people in agriculture, including corn and soybean farmers, cattle ranchers, and fruit and vegetable producers. The $46 billion in direct government payments to farmers in 2020 broke the previous annual record by about $10 billion, even after accounting for inflation. Continue Reading Farmers Got Big Government Pandemic Relief In 2020, Even Those Who Didn’t Need It

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