Northwest News

Northwest News

Oregon senators convene at the Capitol on Monday, Dec. 21, 2020 during a one-day special session to address specific COVID-19 relief issues. Protesters against coronavirus safety measures broke doors and tried to force their way inside. CREDIT: Dirk VanderHart/OPB

For 3rd Straight Year, Oregon Senate Republicans Stage Walkout To Stop Legislative Business

Criticizing a session they say is moving too quickly, Republicans refused to attend a floor session of the Oregon House on Tuesday evening. Lawmakers showed up to the House chamber at 6 p.m. with Rep. Cheri Helt, R-Bend, the only Republican in attendance. Continue Reading For 3rd Straight Year, Oregon Senate Republicans Stage Walkout To Stop Legislative Business

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A cracked road from an earthquake

When ‘The Big One’ Hits The Northwest, What Could You Do With A Few Seconds Warning?

Smartphone users who opted in to a test of the West Coast earthquake early warning system got an early taste on Thursday of what is to come. Mobile phones from Seattle to Olympia blared with an alarm for imaginary incoming shaking. The earthquake warning system — already operational in California — will launch for the general public in Oregon on March 11 and statewide in Washington in May. Continue Reading When ‘The Big One’ Hits The Northwest, What Could You Do With A Few Seconds Warning?

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Washington State Supreme Court building in Olympia. CREDIT: TONY OVERMAN

Washington Supreme Court Strikes Down State’s Felony Drug Possession Law

In a decision with implications for tens of thousands of cases dating back decades, the Washington Supreme Court on Thursday struck down the state’s felony drug possession law because — unlike the laws of every other state — it did not require prosecutors to prove someone knowingly or intentionally possessed drugs. Continue Reading Washington Supreme Court Strikes Down State’s Felony Drug Possession Law

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A young cougar, which was previously tagged with a tracking collar, is treed by hounds in Washington. Courtesy of Buddy Woodberry

New Rule Allowing Hound Training For Cougar Tracking Highlights Wildlife-Human Challenges

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Commission recently approved a new rule that could soon grant George’s wish. But the rule is not without controversy. Many conservationists worry that training more hound handlers could put a strain on Washington’s cougar population and lead to catastrophic unintended consequences for the big cats. Continue Reading New Rule Allowing Hound Training For Cougar Tracking Highlights Wildlife-Human Challenges

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Black pioneer George Bush's grandson, left, and son, right, stand next to a fanning mill on the family's farm near present day Tumwater, Washington. A monument to George Bush and his family is planned for Washington's Capitol Campus. CREDIT: Washington State Historical Society

New Monument At Washington State Capitol Will Honor Black Pioneer George Bush And Family

Washington’s sprawling Capitol campus features war memorials, a granite monument to fallen police officers, a replica of a Roman-style fountain and a brass sundial. As soon as this summer a new monument will join the collection. It will honor George Bush, Washington’s first Black pioneer, along with his son, William Owen Bush, who was the state’s first Black lawmaker, and their family. Continue Reading New Monument At Washington State Capitol Will Honor Black Pioneer George Bush And Family

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How Do We ‘Bridge The Divide’ Across The Northwest? We Ask That In Re:Building Democracy

Deepening polarization is eroding faith in the electoral and democratic process on which our democracy depends. What can we do to cultivate mutual respect, repair damaged relationships, and reweave a civic fabric frayed from years of growing division? In this episode, produced by NWPB, we discuss working and speaking together in the Northwest in a climate that is increasingly difficult to do so. Continue Reading How Do We ‘Bridge The Divide’ Across The Northwest? We Ask That In Re:Building Democracy

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