Frustrated By Delayed Unemployment Benefits, Laid Off Workers Turn To Washington Supreme Court

Washington State Supreme Court building in Olympia. CREDIT: TONY OVERMAN
Washington State Supreme Court building in Olympia. CREDIT: Tony Overman

READ ON

Frustration with long delays in getting jobless benefits is boiling over into a lawsuit against the Washington State Employment Security Department. Attorneys representing two laid off workers and the nonprofit Unemployment Law Project filed the case directly with the state Supreme Court on Friday.

The commissioner of the employment department told reporters this week that her agency is doing everything it can to get checks out to legitimate claimants. However, Commissioner Suzi LeVine said a flood of fraudulent claims submitted by cybercriminals in May has “thrown a wrench” in the gears. An agency spokesman did not immediately respond to a request for comment specifically on the legal case late Friday.

Laid-off restaurant worker Katrina Thiessen is frustrated by the weeks-long delay in having her unemployment claim approved.

Laid-off restaurant worker Katrina Thiessen is frustrated by the weeks-long delay in having her unemployment claim approved. CREDIT: Tom Banse/N3

The lawsuit asks the justices of the high court to order LeVine to provide “prompt” payment of unemployment benefits to Washingtonians. The filing asserted that LeVine has a legal duty to promptly process and pay claimants and alleged she has failed in this duty.

“People understand the Covid virus has presented a major crisis and many systems are overloaded,” said John Tirpak, executive director of the Unemployment Law Project. “People have been patient and know things are not going to happen instantly. But when you have been attempting to claim unemployment since March and it’s already June and there has been no progress, it’s very discouraging.”

The Unemployment Law Project is a nonprofit law firm with offices in Seattle and Spokane that help people receive jobless benefits and appeal denied claims. The two additional named plaintiffs in the case are Marianne White, a laid off manager of a tap room in Burien, and McKeezi Barraza of Seattle.

Barraza was laid off in March when the coronavirus pandemic shut down the restaurant where he worked part time. He said he collected unemployment for more than a month, but then he and several hundred thousand other Washingtonians on the rolls had their accounts frozen in mid to late May pending identity verification checks.

“They said it could be anywhere from four to six weeks before I’m paid,” Barraza said in an interview Thursday. “To me, that’s unacceptable because I couldn’t even pay rent this month for June. I’ve got a few hundred dollars left in my pocket.”

During a press conference Thursday, ESD Commissioner LeVine said she was fully aware “that people are really hurting out there.” She pledged the agency was leaving no stone unturned to get benefits out to legitimate applicants while weeding out the fraudulent claims.

“I hope the people of Washington understand the importance of both getting the money out as quickly as possible, and not sending out money to criminals,” LeVine said.

In legalese, the lawsuit takes the form of a “petition for a writ of mandamus.” Plaintiffs’ attorney Justin Abbasi defined mandamus as basically when a petitioner asks the court to direct a government official to do their job.

Commissioner Suzi LeVine addressed unemployment claim processing delays during a media teleconference Thursday. CREDIT: WA ESD via Zoom

Commissioner Suzi LeVine addressed unemployment claim processing delays during a media teleconference Thursday. CREDIT: WA ESD via Zoom