Practice Drill For ‘The Big One’ Earthquake With NWPB

Be prepared graphic
Courtesy of the Great Washington Shakeout

You’ve probably heard the Northwest is overdue for a big earthquake. You could be anywhere when it strikes: at home, at work, at school or even on vacation. It can happen any time of the year.

What you do NOW will determine your quality of life after the next big earthquake. Are you prepared to survive on your own for two weeks?

You’re invited to participate in the Great Washington Shakeout with Northwest Public Broadcasting. On October 17, at 10:17 AM, practice with us when you hear the alarm on our stations. Drop, cover and hold on. 

Prepare your emergency kit for yourself, family and pets. You’ll need enough supplies, especially water, food and medicine to survive on your own for 2 weeks. Bridges, roads and power lines will likely be down and emergency crews may not get to you fast enough.

Items to put in an emergency kit.

Consider camping in your home to stay warm. Pitch a tent in the living room. Make camping meals.

And here are stories from Northwest reporters with information to help inspire and inform you on being prepared for the big one.

The following story is of particular importance.

Have You Planned For Number Two After ‘The Big One’?

Toilet paper roll

Remember the toilet paper and plan where to go to the bathroom because the sewer system may not be working.

Related Stories:

Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital facilities director Chris Lemar shows flexible piping designed to withstand earthquake shaking in the new hospital. CREDIT: Tom Banse/N3

Prepping For ‘The Big One’: Coastal Hospitals Get Creative With Disaster Planning

The state of Oregon is pushing the community hospitals along the Oregon Coast to improve their earthquake resilience. This comes after a state report predicted none of them would be able to sustain operations after the feared Big One — a magnitude 9 offshore Cascadia earthquake and tsunami. Continue Reading Prepping For ‘The Big One’: Coastal Hospitals Get Creative With Disaster Planning

About 20 homes burned in this Pateros neighborhood, which included the mayor at the time, Libby Harrison, and her mom’s home behind her. The community church behind it survived, but the pastor’s home next door burned. CREDIT: Scott A. Leadingham

Wildfire Lessons Teach Counties How To Communicate With Spanish Speakers In Other Disasters

Communication is key in emergencies. That’s especially true when the people you’re working to protect don’t speak English. That’s why Washington emergency management offices are working on their language skills — whether for a fire, earthquake or any emergency. Continue Reading Wildfire Lessons Teach Counties How To Communicate With Spanish Speakers In Other Disasters