Environment

Environment

A northern spotted owl. CREDIT: Todd Sonflieth/OPB

Much More Than A Spotted Owl Fight: Northwest ‘Timber Wars’ Of 30 Years Ago Revisited In Podcast

Here’s a quick game: When you hear, “spotted owl,” what do you think of? If you were in the Northwest in the 1980s and 1990s, you may think of logging and a fight over endangered species versus jobs and lumber towns surviving. But there’s much more background in that fight than you may remember. Continue Reading Much More Than A Spotted Owl Fight: Northwest ‘Timber Wars’ Of 30 Years Ago Revisited In Podcast

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Adult fall Chinook salmon in the Priest Rapids Hatchery. CREDIT: PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY

Idaho Chinook Salmon Numbers Rise, For Now…But Extinction Looms

The number of chinook salmon returning to the Middle Fork of the Salmon River and its tributaries is just a tiny fraction of historic numbers, experts said. “More is better, but it’s still abysmal numbers,” said Russ Thurow, a research fisheries scientist with the U.S. Forest Service based in the small city of Salmon. “We’re bouncing around just above extinction.” Continue Reading Idaho Chinook Salmon Numbers Rise, For Now…But Extinction Looms

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In one experimental plot, many of the sagebrush in this Moses Coulee area of central Washington were burned to a crisp during the September 2020 Pearl Hill Fire. It can take decades for sagebrush to fully recover after an extremely intense wildfire. CREDIT: Courtney Flatt/NWPB

In Dry Eastern Washington, Scientists Look To Rangeland Management To Address Catastrophic Fires

As Washington works to combat climate change, can rangelands be better managed to make wildfires less catastrophic? What are the most effective solutions to remove invasive grasses, like cheatgrass, which dries out quickly, burns extremely hot and helps fires jump from bunchgrass to bunchgrass? Continue Reading In Dry Eastern Washington, Scientists Look To Rangeland Management To Address Catastrophic Fires

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Drought conditions in the U.S. West, particularly parts of the Northwest, could be eased by an expected 2020-21 La La Niña winter. CREDIT: U.S. Drought Monitor

Looking Forward And Backward: A La Niña Winter And Dry Conditions That Fueled Northwest Fires

The Northwest could see a cooler and wetter winter this season, according to climate outlook models. Forecasters say it’s likely that a recently developed La Niña weather pattern in the Pacific Ocean will continue. That should lead to above average precipitation in Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Continue Reading Looking Forward And Backward: A La Niña Winter And Dry Conditions That Fueled Northwest Fires

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