Music & Culture

Classical Music Posts

Johann Sebastian Bach playing the organ, not the lautenwerck, circa 1725. From a print in the British Museum. Rischgitz/Getty Images

Bach’s Favorite Instrument You’ve Probably Never Heard Of: The Long-Lost Lautenwerck

No lautenwerks survived the 19th century. Picture extremely delicate harpsichords — in fact, lautenwercks are alternately called lute-harpsichords. Their strings are made of guts, originally from sheep (like lutes), which gives lautenwercks a warm, intimate tone distinct from brassy, metal-strung harpsichords. Continue Reading Bach’s Favorite Instrument You’ve Probably Never Heard Of: The Long-Lost Lautenwerck

Read More »

Women’s History Music Moment: Toby Saks

The chamber music impresaria Toby Saks became a legend in the music life of the Pacific Northwest. She began her career in New York: she earned awards as a teenage cellist; she played in the New York Philharmonic in her 20s. She moved out west to join the faculty of the University of Washington School of Music, and soon gathered a group of classical music supporters to launch the Seattle Chamber Music Festival. Continue Reading Women’s History Music Moment: Toby Saks

Read More »

Women’s History Music Moment: Helen, Countess of Radnor

Helen, Countess of Rador seemed to care very little for what society said she could or couldn’t do as a Victorian Lady – so she decided to make history.  

Born in a tiny town in Central England, a young Helen moved to London, moved to London, married an Earl, and started her [new] life as a countess and patron of the arts.  Continue Reading Women’s History Music Moment: Helen, Countess of Radnor

Read More »