Music & Culture

Classical Music Posts

Rachel Jameton, left, and Jane Finan, right

StoryCorps Northwest: Two Science Professors On The Importance Of Mentorship

Rachel Jameton struggled as a new teacher at Lewis Clark State College in Lewiston, Idaho. Her colleague, Jane Finan, co-taught biology with her. The two talk about mentorship and how disappointing a teacher can be transformative for a student, in this episode of  StoryCorps Northwest, recorded virtually. Continue Reading StoryCorps Northwest: Two Science Professors On The Importance Of Mentorship

Read More »

Cello Plus Piano Equals Jan Vogler, Alessio Bax And Beethoven For A Tiny Desk (Home) Concert

For this Tiny Desk (home) concert, we pay a visit to the doctor’s office. Actually, the venue is called Rare Violins of New York and it’s something of a second home to cellist Jan Vogler, who pops in frequently to have the experts give his 1708 Stradivarius cello a thorough checkup. Continue Reading Cello Plus Piano Equals Jan Vogler, Alessio Bax And Beethoven For A Tiny Desk (Home) Concert

Read More »
Sergio Arau (center) poses with fellow Botellita de Jerez bandmates. They were one of the most influential groups in the '80s after rock re-emerged in Mexico following 15 years of censorship and repression. CREDIT: Lourdes Grobet

‘Rompan Todo’ Explores A Turbulent History Of Latin America Through Rock Music

Break Everything — Rompan Todo in Spanish — begins in the early ’60s in Mexico, where bands like Los Teen Tops started covering American hits. Others, including Mexico’s Los Locos del Ritmo and Uruguay’s Los Shakers also inspired many young musicians across Latin America to play their own version of rock. Continue Reading ‘Rompan Todo’ Explores A Turbulent History Of Latin America Through Rock Music

Read More »
Step-daugher Robin with her step-mother, Evelyn Woods

StoryCorps Northwest: ‘Hardest Thing To Be Is A Black Person’ Says Jewish Woman Who Hid In Attic

When Spokane resident Evelyn Woods was a little girl in World War II Germany, she hid in an attic with her Jewish parents. In today’s StoryCorps Northwest, Evelyn’s step-daughter, Robin, asks her how that confinement compares to today’s COVID-19 restrictions. Evelyn, 82, discusses that and the Black Lives Matter movement in this segment of StoryCorps Northwest recorded virtually. Continue Reading StoryCorps Northwest: ‘Hardest Thing To Be Is A Black Person’ Says Jewish Woman Who Hid In Attic

Read More »

Borromeo String Quartet Marks Beethoven’s 250th Year With A Tiny Desk (Home) Concert

The humorous side of Beethoven’s personality seeps into his music, such as the false stops and musical giggles that fuel his two-minute-long Presto from the Quartet Op. 130, which opens this performance. For contrast, the Borromeos follow with a serious movement from later on in the same piece, the prayerful Cavatina, which Beethoven said even got him choked up. Continue Reading Borromeo String Quartet Marks Beethoven’s 250th Year With A Tiny Desk (Home) Concert

Read More »
Paul McCartney has released McCartney III, the latest in a trilogy of solo recordings that stretches back to 1970. CREDIT: Mary McCartney

On ‘McCartney III,’ Paul McCartney Is A One-Man Show Again

Back in 1970, as the book was closing on The Beatles’ time together, Paul McCartney came out with a release that established him as an artist in his own right — and a versatile one, who played every instrument on the album simply titled McCartney. In 1980, he followed it up with McCartney II — another kind of do-it-yourself solo album, released as another band of his, Wings, was breaking up. Now, after another 40 years, the artist has been quite busy in quarantine. Continue Reading On ‘McCartney III,’ Paul McCartney Is A One-Man Show Again

Read More »