Music & Culture

Classical Music Posts

Women’s History Music Moment: Bach’s Daughters

You’ve heard so much about the sons of Johann Sebastian Bach, but there were daughters, too.

Bach was 23, and his wife Maria Barbara was 24, when the first of their children was born. They named her Catherina Dorothea. CD grew into a singer, and helped out in her father’s music work. Fifteen years passed, her mother died, her father remarried, and finally, CD Bach acquired a sister: Cristina Sophia Henrietta, daughter of Johann Sebastian and Anna Magdalena Bach. CSH died at the age of three, just as another sister, Elizabeth Juliana Frederica, was born. EJF Bach would grow up to marry one of her father’s students. Continue Reading Women’s History Music Moment: Bach’s Daughters

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Women’s History Music Moment: Barbara Strozzi

Barbara Strozzi changed the face of vocal music with her stunning and emotional song collections. 

Born to a famous poet and librettist, she was encouraged to follow her artistic talents from an early age and received a musical education from other famous Italian composers. 

Strozzi wasn’t afraid to experiment. She made a big name herself in the 17th century, writing songs for sopranos and mezzos, and collections of non religious music; songs and texts that have lived for 400 years. Continue Reading Women’s History Music Moment: Barbara Strozzi

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On A Remote Island, A Music School Flourishes

As pianist Mahani Teave was poised to launch her international career, she remembered the moment when the first piano arrived on her remote island. It was 1992, she was nine years old and the instrument landed on Rapa Nui, or Easter Island as it was named by Europeans. Best known for its mysterious, sentinel-like stone statues, the island lies some 2000 miles off the coast of Chile. Continue Reading On A Remote Island, A Music School Flourishes

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Women’s History Music Moment: Margriet Tindemans

Maestra Margriet Tindemans made history as a performer of early music. The Pacific Northwest was her home for the final three decades of her influential career, but she started as a child violinist in a 1950s European youth orchestra. Born in the Netherlands, Tindemans developed mastery on all manner of medieval, renaissance and baroque string instruments, adding her authoritative performances to early-music ensembles worldwide. When a concert tour brought her to Seattle in 1986, she fell in love, decided to stay, and began her historic impact on the musical life of the Pacific Northwest. Continue Reading Women’s History Music Moment: Margriet Tindemans

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